Deprivation Health

We are building and supporting a clinical workforce who are prepared to work in areas of deprivation, effectively and passionately.

Many people in a waiting room to see a doctor

The challenge

Those that most need good healthcare are the least likely to receive it.

The Inverse Care Law is prevalent across the health sector.

Clinicians working in deprived areas have more patients. These patients are at higher risk of developing multiple health problems as well as facing disproportionate social complexity.

Health professionals have the potential to transform their communities. Whilst there is a move towards more holistic approaches to healthcare nationally, a huge culture shift away from traditional medical approaches is still needed. Shared Health are preparing the change makers necessary for this shift in practice

Our work and interventions

Our work in the area of deprivation medicine focuses on reducing the inequity gap.

We strive to make sure that no matter the complexity of the patient, health professionals have the resources to help them.

We start from the bottom up, educating and inspiring, in addition to bringing experienced doctors together to share knowledge, support each other and work towards a common goal of reducing health inequalities.

We deliver Deprivation Health and Health Inequalities across numerous medical schools across the Northwest, as well as to new and experienced doctors, allied health professionals and other clinical staff across the health sector.

We are proud to lead the DeepEnd GM network (part of the wider DeepEnd movement) to support not only doctors but all those who work in clinical and health settings to remain compassionate, enthused, informed and supported. We are building our Network of Champions which supports clinicians, across the health sector, to be trained and supported in delivery of a trauma-informed approach to healthcare.

In partnership with Health Education England, we deliver a unique GP Speciality Training Programme which is deprivation focused. The Greater Manchester Deprivation GPST Programme is a three-year scheme which prepares GPs to work in disadvantaged communities and embeds a culture of resilience, wellbeing and development. More information and the programme Theory of Change can be found here.

Shared Health Deprivation Medicine Collaboration
Team of healthcare workers having a meeting in boardroom. Medical professional briefing medication plan to colleagues on digital tablet.

The impact

Health professionals have the potential to transform their communities.

Our work sees recruitment and retention of both early career and experienced clinicians who work in very deprived areas. Not only this, these clinicians are able to innovate and develop more inclusive care systems, with the knowledge and support of a wider network of peers. 

Trainees on the GP Speciality Training Programme in the year 2020-2021 have not only reported better wellbeing than those about to start the programme, but have also shown an increased confidence and interest in providing effective care to those with interplaying social complexity. 95% intend to work in an area of deprivation when they finish training. 

Feedback

“Such inspiring talks by the Shared Health Team. It made me feel more confident that there are other GPs/Health professionals to help support change & improve health inequality”

“It was wonderful to feel I was amongst like minded colleagues, very inspiring. Nice to hear not just the problems we face, but the practical and innovative solutions to try too!”

Preliminary Review - GPST Programme

Downloadable Documents

To learn more about out work and our findings on this project, click the button below to download these documents:

  • Our Theory of Change
  • GP Training Report: Preliminary Review

Network of Champions

Learn more about our Network of Champions initiative, bringing together like-minded medics who share your passion for seeing the person behind the diagnosis and working to understand how deprivation truly affects physical and mental health.